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HELP FOR PINS AND NEEDLES IN ARMS AND HANDS IN SPALDING

Specialist help and advice for paresthesia (tingling in hands and arms) from State 11 Soft Tissue Therapy in Spalding, Lincolnshire 

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Over 450 reviews on Facebook, Google and TrustPilot.

PARESTHESIA IS ANNOYING OR EVEN PAINFUL TINGLING IN THE HANDS, ARMS OR BODY. IT CAN BE A DIFFICULT CONDITION TO UNDERSTAND OR RESOLVE; STATE 11 IS HERE TO HELP YOU.

Content written by Greg Pritchard, RAPID NeuroFascial Reset Specialist, BTEC L5 Soft Tissue Therapy (CSSM), MFHT

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Tingling or pins and needles in the hands, arms or other part of the body, is medically known as paresthesia.

 

Paresthesia covers a wide range of sensations, from mild tingling to complete numbness. These sensations typically arise in the arms and hands, and some people can find it worrying or concerning, especially if there's no obvious cause. 

If you find that you lose control of a limb, and are unable to move it, please call 999 or visit A&E as a matter of urgency, even if it is only transitory. 

THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF PARESTHESIA

  • Lack of Movement and Positioning: Holding your arm, hand, foot or leg in the same, or odd, position for a long time can cause numbness or tingling. For instance - sleeping on one arm all night can cause paraesthesia (this is common for people who sleep deeply or who fall asleep after drinking). Sitting with one leg underneath the buttocks can also cause tingling in the leg being sat on.
     

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) and Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI): Repetitive hand or wrist movements can result in CTS or RSI. This is often seen in people who type a lot or production line workers who do the same movements over and over. CTS and RSI can cause pain across the forearm, wrists, and hands.
     

  • Compression Neuropathy: This scary sounding medical term simply means pressure on a nerve in the arm or the hand. This pressure can be caused by external factors, like a watch band that is too right, but also internal factors, like an injury, a ganglion cyst, arthritic spurs or muscular issues. Compression neuropathy feels like tingling, pins and needles or numbness. 
     

  • Cervical Radiculopathy: Another scary sounding term, cervical radiculopathy just means a nerve in the neck (between the C6 vertebrae and T1 vertebrae) is being compressed. This can be caused by problems like arthritis, spinal canal narrowing, or herniated discs. While these terms sound concerning, they are often just a regular part of aging and come without any pain.
     

  • Vitamin B Deficiency: A lack in vitamin B12 can lead to nerve damage, manifesting as tingling or numbness in the arms and legs. If you think you might be deficient in vitamin B12, it's important to see your GP, before starting any supplementation regime, as supplements can mask a B12 deficiency.
     

  • Other Causes: While soft tissue-related factors often contribute to pins and needles in the arms or hands, it's crucial to consider other underlying conditions. Multiple sclerosis, liver disease, alcoholism, and nerve damage from various sources can also lead to persistent tingling and numbness. 

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TREATMENT FOR PARESTHESIA OR TINGLING IN THE LIMBS

Because there are many different causes of paresthesia, there are different treatments. 

For paresthesia that is caused by lack of movement or external compression, moving the limbs, or removing the cause of the compression (like taking off the watch that is too tight) can help reduce or even remove the tingling, pins and needles or numbness. 

Other types of paresthesia can be helped using specialist soft tissue therapy (like that offered at State 11) which can help reduce aches and pains and help with the sensation from trapped and compressed nerves. 

SPECIALIST HELP FOR PARAESTHESIA OR PINS AND NEEDLES, NUMBNESS OR TINGLING IN THE LIMBS

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If you develop persistent paresthesia, it can be worth checking your symptoms with a GP or doctor, because some types of paresthesia may require further medical intervention (such as internal compression paresthesia). 

At State 11, we use RAPID NeuroFascial Reset to help people with paresthesia can back to living their lives again. 

RAPID is an advanced soft tissue therapy technique that involves a therapist applying precise pressure to areas of your body while instructing you to make specific movements. This in turn can help reduce pain by using the body's own nervous system and healing abilities - you can find out more about how RAPID works on this page. 

WHAT OUR CLIENTS SAY:
REAL REVIEWS FROM PEOPLE LIKE YOU!

Marcus says:

Greg has twice now sorted out a couple of aches and pains that were giving me grief. A very relaxed atmosphere, friendly, no hard sales to get you to return for a second visit, did not need to on both occasions, as he worked his magic first time.

Romas says:

Today I met Greg for the first time. I have tried many physical therapists because I suffer from back herniation. I found this guy based on Google's recommendations from his clients and I didn't regret it at all, this guy knows what he's doing and I immediately felt relief in my back and leg. I recommend it to everyone

Jacqui says:

I went with pain in my left leg, an irritated old injury. Not only did Greg sort this out but he freed up my left ankle (arthritis) and for the first time in ages it doesn't feel as if my left foot is 'turning over,' when I walk. Two for the price of one... what's not to love.

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