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GET HELP FOR ANKLE PAIN FROM INJURY EXPERTS, STATE 11 IN SPALDING

The ankle is an extremely mobile joint, and can become painful as a result of a sprain, strain or other injury. Left untreated, ankle pain can cause issues for the knee, hip and even the back. 

At State 11, we're specialists in helping with joint problems. 

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LEARN ABOUT THE ANKLE, THE CAUSES OF ANKLE PAIN AND HOW YOU CAN TREAT ANKLE PAIN AT HOME FROM STATE 11 SPALDING

Content written by Greg Pritchard, RAPID NeuroFascial Reset Specialist, BTEC L5 Soft Tissue Therapy (CSSM), MFHT

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Pretty much every child sprains their ankle at least once, but as we get older, ankle sprains and strains can take much longer to heal and need proper rehabilitation for a fully, speedy recovery.

Although this page shouldn’t be substituted for hands on medical advice, here’s some information about the ankle and ankle sprains, what you should do if you’ve sprained your ankle and what we at State 11 Soft Tissue Therapy can do to help speed your recovery from this potentially long term injury.

WHAT CAUSES ANKLE PAIN?

An ankle sprain is a stretch or tear in one or more of the outside (the medical term for this is “lateral”) ligaments of the ankle.

Ankle ligaments are slightly elastic bands of tissue that keep the ankle bones in place. Since the ankle is responsible for both weight-bearing and mobility, it is particularly susceptible to injury. The ankle is a relatively small joint, and it has to withstand large forces exerted when walking, running and jumping, especially if the surface is uneven.

 

Most ankle sprains happen when the ankle twists or rolls suddenly, which is usually a rapid and uncontrolled movement. The most common injuries happen when the foot rolls onto the outside of the ankle, straining the outside ligaments of the ankle joint.

 

Symptoms of a sprained ankle include; pain, tenderness and swelling, bruising, trouble moving the ankle, and sometimes an inability to put your full weight on the ankle.

Most people recover completely from mild sprains within two to six weeks. More severe sprains can take up to six months before you can return to full activity, or sport.

 

Once a significant sprain occurs, without good rehabilitation the joint may never be as strong as it was before the injury. It is not surprising therefore that many people have a history of repeated ankle sprains.

 

With the correct rehabilitation however, you can help your ankle become even stronger than it was before the injury. 

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HOME TREATMENT FOR ANKLE PAIN

Many people initially try to treat their ankle pain at home. 

 

If you're able to take painkillers, many people find them useful for reducing pain whilst still allowing mobility. Anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen can slow down healing (inflammation is part of the healing process in most cases), but non-anti-inflammatories can still reduce pain. If you're not sure if you can take painkillers, you should speak to your GP or pharmacist.

Heat therapy can also help, feeling soothing and gentle on the ankle. The advice about applying ice to the ankle is now outdated, and can actually slow healing. 

Changing footwear can also be beneficial, depending on the cause of the ankle pain. Runners may find that changing their running shoes, or making sure that they are wearing shoes that suit their running style, can reduce ankle pain. 

 

Home kinesiology taping may also be worth considering. Taping can provide altered sensation, and a feeling of support across the ankle joint, as well as potentially helping reduce inflammation and swelling. We recommend Sport Tape (use this link and the discount code VICTORIA10 for 10% off your first order), and there's plenty of videos available on YouTube about how to use taping for ankle pain.

GETTING PROFESSIONAL, SPECIALIST HELP FOR ANKLE PAIN IN SPALDING

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If you've tried home remedies for your ankle pain but not found relief, you may wish to seek professional help. 

Some people choose to visit their GP, which can results in prescription of stronger painkillers or referral to NHS physiotherapy service for exercise and exercise advice. 

Others choose to investigate specialist manual therapies such as sports massage. Because the ankle is a bony joint, massage to this area can be both painful and slow to help due to the area having less muscle than other areas. 

At State 11, we use an advanced manual therapy technique called RAPID NeuroFascial Reset which specially developed to treat joint pain and pain on movement. By manipulating your ankle, we can help you to resolve the pain so that you can move easier again. 

In some cases, we may also use sports taping (for support) and Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Manipulation to help further.

WHAT OUR CLIENTS SAY:
REAL REVIEWS FROM PEOPLE LIKE YOU!

Xyanthe says:

Where do I start - first saw me last Sunday after I’d asked online for recommendations at 5pm, by 9pm I was seeing Greg for the start of my treatment. It was so nice to get straight on with treatment instead of spending the time form filling! (These can be done online prior).
 

Appointments can also be booked online, or message Greg he is quick to respond. There are early morning and late night appointments to choose from - so if you are needing to see someone for some soft tissue manipulation Greg is your man! Have been back again tonight for further treatment. I really can’t recommend him enough.

Trish says:

I highly recommend Greg. I first saw him in September with foot and ankle pain which he worked on and resolved in one visit.

I saw him again yesterday when he worked on my left shoulder, neck and arm. plus a little maintenance on my ankle.

Again he was brilliant!

Thank you Greg.

Carole says:

When you walk upstairs & realise it doesn't hurt anymore is when you know everything Greg put you through was worth it.

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